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editor

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editor last won the day on May 15 2019

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  • Birthday 04/27/1971

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    http://www.houstonarchitecture.com
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    HAIF

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  1. I've decided to bring back Ad-Free HAIF. For those of you who weren't here the last time we had Ad-Free HAIF, it's pretty self-explanatory. For a small fee, you can HAIF without seeing any advertisements. People these days hate advertisements quite a lot. This is a way for you to do two things: Avoid seeing ads on HAIF Support HAIF You can achieve #1 with a browser ad-blocker, but then you're doing the opposite of #2. And why would you want to do that? I've decided to keep the old pricing structure for this new launch. It's simple: $5/month or $50/year The last time we did this, it was nice to see some people were buying multiple years, not because they hated ads that much, but because they just wanted to support HAIF. It made me all warm and fuzzy. Since this is a soft launch, there's no fancy credit card check-out or anything. Just send me a message, and we'll work out a payment method. Right now, I take: Apple Pay/Apple Cash, PayPal Checks, Frank's Pizza gift cards If you have any questions, send me a message.
  2. Yeah, this sounds like the baby steps toward a Western "social credit score" like the Chinese government has for its citizens now, where if you post unpopular opinions on social media you can be banned from flying, traveling outside your state/region, prohibited from advancing in your career, and other things.
  3. Probably not dismantled. Probably just neglected until they don't work anymore, and then they'll just sit in the public way and embarrass us in front of visitors. Like almost all of the fountains in the downtown "Costwald District," and the ones at Main Street Square, and Sesquicentennial Park, and...
  4. I voted for "project" because it's the closest thing to address. The reason I think address is best is because, in my estimation, people are more likely to wonder, "What was supposed to be here?" Rather than, "What didn't get built in 19xx." Also, I don't think decade works because lots of project proposals limp along for years that often span decade boundaries. Someone may remember, "Wasn't there supposed to be a skyscraper built here in the 70's? Or was it the 80's?" and having decade boundaries makes it harder to find. I'm all in favor of decade tags, and project tags since projects frequently change names as they move from idea to cancellation. But I think of those as refining factors, not defining factors.
  5. That's what I thought at first, too. But it's 45 at 8, according to the satellite maps.
  6. I was surprised to learn recently that there are more than 900 roundabouts in the United States. In the 70's i remember New Jersey had three massive ones all in a row on Route 23. They were maybe four or five lanes wide. Eventually they were replaced by full overpasses. But i always find it strange that people on the internet claim there are no roundabouts in America. I guess they never leave their mom's basements.
  7. i went by there yesterday, and it's s lot of heavy construction and literally making mounds out molehills. Much concrete work going on. "How do we bring a public park closer to nature? Let's pour concrete!" — pretty much the most Houston though ever.
  8. Sadly, last I checked, Spindletop is closed. Sad, too, because I had a great Saint Valentine's Day dinner there.
  9. Do people smoke crack anymore? Didn't that go out of fashion in like 1987? Then it was hillbilly heroin. Then it was soccer mom heroin. The cocaine came back briefly. Now it's pills, right? Or is crack back?
  10. I'm not sure I understand "individual ESG score" since ESG is about companies, not people. At least that's how I understand it. To me, it doesn't seem any different than old-school advocacy investors, like when nuns buy up huge blocks of big companies in order to change their social positions. It's been going on for at least half a century. Perhaps more. It's the flip side of a theoretical big oil company buying huge blocks of shares in a theoretical car manufacturer to encourage that car make to make cars that use more oil.
  11. You may also want to post thing like this in the calendar.
  12. I used to have an office with a window. I also used to have a local newspaper that wasn't afraid of controversy. Chronicle today: Elsewhere today:
  13. I-45 at Beltway 8. A bit blurry because of the jet engine exhaust:
  14. ...and HOU: 07F3856C-5B94-4966-8A2B-74AAC9D44642_1_201_a.hei
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