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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/07/20 in all areas

  1. We need a street, Park or square downtown named after Hines. Heck rename the skyline district the Hines district. Very few people have shaped the CBD more. If they ever convert the bank of the SW lot into a square Hines should definitely be a top contender for naming
    8 points
  2. https://communityimpact.com/houston/heights-river-oaks-montrose/development/2020/02/06/luxury-midrise-westmore-to-break-ground-in-upper-kirby-this-summer/
    8 points
  3. I came across this event on Facebook and thought I’d share because it’s for a good cause. Livelihood will be planting 100 trees at Buffalo Bayou Park if anyone wants to attend and meet up there! here is the link https://livelihoodprojects.org/plantings
    7 points
  4. Looks like they have built 15 floors. Just about a third of the way up. The two Hines towers, plus their last one are really changing the skyline.
    7 points
  5. Half a block up the road are apts that 99.9 of residents of third ward cant afford... but this is the line in the sand they want to draw? A project that would transform a dead, abandoned area that become nothing more than a camp site for the homeless and drug dealers?!
    7 points
  6. https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2020/02/07/cbre-dishes-on-search-for-restaurant-operator-for.html?iana=hpmvp_hstn_news_headline
    6 points
  7. Such agreements are negotiated to ensure that a developer delivers community benefits, like hiring, inclusion of affordable housing or funding for community programs, in exchange for residents’ support of the project and developments in or near their community, according to the Kinder Institute for Urban Research’s Third Ward Policy and Program Landscape Report. This main thing I could see helping is the hiring part. If this project displaced houses or other community centers then I get it but this is taking away Sears and surface lots. The benefit is pushing out drug dealers. Thou
    6 points
  8. Some pix from today: And like its namesake, the sign has fallen on hard times.
    5 points
  9. It is complex. The Houston metro appears to have three large ecosystems: The Northern swath north of Beltway 8 is heavily forested to the point it is jungle like especially in the northeast (where I live). It is an especially thick version of the Southern Pinelands. It has much in common with Southern Louisiana. The western metro appears drier and more prairie like, and the southeast region has a wet coastal environment. There are not to many cities with this variety. It is one of the things (among many) which is fascinating about our area. I think this area is gifted with the ability to grow
    5 points
  10. Holy crap, its actually happening. I drive by that area every few days, and just getting rid of that old building and putting anything on it (including a mattress firm) would be a huge improvement and make that area seem a little less...cold and deserted. Putting a 10 story medical building with constant traffic will 100% spur development in a tiny pocket of land that is strangely devoid of it and maybe rehabilitate some of those older buildings (some are actually quite nice).
    5 points
  11. I think upgrading the park and ride to all-day, every day regional express buses has the potential to be genuinely transformational. The details will be important of course, but even seeing these proposed BRT stations along 45 gives me a lot of hope.
    5 points
  12. I posted one on Tuesday with the tower knocked down. The site should be clear of debris by now. Just haven't made it back out there.
    4 points
  13. I'm not even sure what "iconic" means. How does one assess iconistatisity? Is "iconic" famous, beloved, an archetype, or what? The problem is that "iconic" has been over-used to the point where it has very little meaning remaining. Ranting aside, I think 700 Louisiana and Pennzoil could be considered the two most "timeless" Houston buildings.
    4 points
  14. Your basically advocating for rent freezing or how affordable housing is regulated which not only has been proven not to work in the general sense (only really works in isolated instances) it certainly goes against the ethos of our city. The market at some point or another figures it out, and finds a way to correct itself. This is exactly what I'm talking about though. Not only do we have an abnormal amount of office stock compared to the size of our population, but its also scattered throughout the entire city and isn't concentrated in one location. Because there is so m
    3 points
  15. Modern landscaping is tough on soil health. Ground that is continuously mowed gets compact because mowed grass leads to shallow roots which do little to open up the soil. That's not even taking to account the stress from walking back and forth on the soil by mowing and golfers. Other negative habits we do to keeping things picture perfect is blowing grass clippings and raking up leaves. The plants and grass are actively soaking up nutrients from the soil and what do we do? We actively remove nutrients by blowing away the organic matter. Soils then get d
    3 points
  16. I can't believe how well this serves the inner parts of Houston. When this is all in place it's going to help Houston become many times more walkable. When it's completed you'll be able to go from a rockets game in Downtown, to shopping around uptown, then go get some food/also shop around in chinatown, and then catch a plane ride to any destination. This will also be a huge boost to tourism, and just overall livability in Houston. Personally I would have some rail/brt going from N Shepherd to Durham, and Greenway plaza so you can connect that area a little better. While I do see
    3 points
  17. no need to argue about the merits of this design, this won't be it. this was simply a proposal. carry on.
    3 points
  18. Downtown Houston by Marc longoria, on Flickr
    3 points
  19. golf courses are very unique circumstances, and I don't think we can compare the rest of Houston to how they are maintained. while I agree the soil is very compacted, golf courses are aerated at least twice a year. you also can't compare how different parts of the course are maintained. the greens are cut exceedingly short, and very often, which does result in exactly what you are saying with a root system that is very shallow. fairways are going to be longer, and not cut as often, and then there's the first rough cut which is even longer still. that's not taking any c
    2 points
  20. You really notice it when you drive all of 99. Not only does it drive like the Autobahn haha, but you also get the chance to see just how much variety in our ecosystem we have. We might lack elevation, but we more than make up for it with ecosystem variety.
    2 points
  21. I wouldn't want to sit next to me either.
    2 points
  22. Houston is also a more complex environment being in the sub-tropics. We seem to be a node where everything starts off from. What might work in one part of Houston might not work in others. Of course I'm not saying that more arid or temperate climates aren't as complex, but they certainly have a more consistent climate that one can reasonably adapt too, and be successful over longer stretches of time. For instance the past few years Houston had very well balanced seasons, but then later we went to a simple hot and cold season with lots of rain, and many years before that we had several years of
    2 points
  23. A bar area? I can get my drink on at the park without my typical brown paper bag? Sign me up!
    2 points
  24. Battelstein's was just listed in the National Register of Historic Places. That seems like a *very* good sign, and might also explain the delay.
    2 points
  25. Maybe Iconic is like porn. Tough to define , but you know it when you see it.
    2 points
  26. Anybody here remember the Four Palms? The Four Palms was a neighborhood bar on Telephone Road just south of Holmes Rd, which is now the South Loop 610. It was locally famous (infamous?) in the 50s, 60s and 70s for being what was then called a "pressure cooker club". It was like a singles bar, except everybody was married to somebody else and nobody cared. Lonely and bored housewives went there during the day whilst their husbands were at work, and the joke was that they kept dinner warm at home in a pressure cooker, hence the club's nickname. The ladies were there to meet their bo
    2 points
  27. Uhmmmmmmmm I was told, The HBG will open in phases.....kids garden and community garden will be first.
    2 points
  28. “Icken said the city has twice previously orchestrated community benefits agreements, both related to the city’s tax abatement. The plan to negotiate an agreement with the Rice Management Co. is unique in that the school has not asked for public assistance with the development of the Ion, Icken said. The hope is that residents in surrounding under-served communities, like the Third Ward, will benefit in some way“ I hardly see this as a cave by Rice. An agreement that is “to be negotiated” is a playground. At a minimum, there’s a healthy opportunity to extract nondisparagement provision
    2 points
  29. No, it’s using the golf course only. So golfers will need to find their way to one of the 9 other municipal courses, while the community suffers with the terrible blight of a botanical garden. Jeesh.
    2 points
  30. Milby Food Market looks like it got a facelift: New paint & wood paneling with a sign for "J's Deli and Bodega". Can't find any info about the company online.
    1 point
  31. Oh no. I absolutely abhor rent freezing. I was only wondering if the market could react in a way that would make downtown more competitive. A rent freeze would be a disaster.
    1 point
  32. "The owner of the adjacent J.W. Marriott Houston Downtown Hotel (historically known as the S.F. Carter Second National Bank Building) purchased the building in 2019 and plans to rehabilitate the building for hotel purposes utilizing state and federal historic tax credits."
    1 point
  33. From the 1978 map, it looks like there are apartments on the Mandell end of the block. That is what I thought I remembered.
    1 point
  34. Ugh. Makes me want to vomit... This quote tells you everything you need to know right here: These kids have officially become cultists.
    1 point
  35. City to negotiate community benefits agreement for anticipated innovation district
    1 point
  36. FYI, you can download Google Earth Pro for free. Then go to the "view > historical imagery" and you can tab thru the years on record.
    1 point
  37. https://houstontx.gov/planning/wp-committee.html
    1 point
  38. Has the city ever considered a Parking variance ordinance that would cut the required spots by, say 50%, within 1,000 feet of train stop? Effectively, it's a deregulation, so both the pro-transit and pro-business people may like it?
    1 point
  39. https://www.chron.com/entertainment/restaurants-bars/article/Katz-s-Deli-to-open-in-the-Heights-in-fall-2020-15031794.php#item-85307-tbla-10 Renderings for Katz's. Michael Hsu seems to now be the architect in residence for the Heights.
    1 point
  40. Montrose is still a melting pot, just with deeper pockets, continuously evolving it's flavor. It's like this weird mix of classy understated wealth (museum district pushing north), party hardy dance clubs (Midtown pushes west), Yuppie restaurants, cafes, retail stores, and spaces (Upper Kirby pushes east), A soulless, corporate wage slave/donut ring apartments pushing south from buffalo bayou park, squeezing this center of gayness/art/counter culture/"alternative" heartbeat which kept the community alive for decades. It sucks when things close down/change that you ident
    1 point
  41. Active? I use to have to go there multiple times at any given time maybe s dozen cars in the lot...I think they will be alright
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. the perspective that can be captured with a UWA lens is great. well shot!
    1 point
  44. The Law Firm of Lynn & Wyatt
    1 point
  45. Thank you for passing this along. It provides some great insight into what the Buffalo Bayou conservancy is trying to accomplish. I really appreciate the fact that they are trying to open the bayou up to the current residents of the area, and also to add more housing opportunities for the lower and middle class population. Anne Olson has continued to lead this Conservancy and the reclamation of Buffalo Bayou in such a positive manner. She deserves some kind of award. I only hope that they continue to move forward as rapidly as possible. I want to be able to see it come to fruition.
    1 point
  46. It strikes me as ironic that a company that got started as a mail order catalog is now getting creamed by online retailers.
    1 point
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