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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/26/18 in all areas

  1. Too bad that atrocious garage above it looks like one giant A/C condenser.
    8 points
  2. It looks like the set back will not ruin the views too much from the other tower.
    7 points
  3. Well, most medical tends to be local, but we do have such highly reputable specialties that people come from all over the world - cancer treatment at MD Anderson, for example. My thought has always been that the US only has 7 truly global cities: NYC, LA, SF, DC, Chicago, Miami, and Houston. United's most recent investor presentation backs it up - see the chart on page 11, 12th slide in the pdf.
    2 points
  4. Would love for Braun to go vertical with the parking here, and use the extra spaces to develop the parking lot south of Torchy's.
    2 points
  5. The Fig & Olive sign is up and they have taken down the boards covering the facade...it is said it could be open as early as March 1st!
    2 points
  6. I am not buying the “office workers stay only in the tunnels” arguement. They don’t. Go to any non-tunnel connected restaraunt at lunch. Lots of people. Walk over to discovery green. Lots of people. Etc. as for retail following rooftops, yes, I understand. However, as I mentioned, there are 100,000 well paid office workers that come to Downtown M-F. There are thousands more that fill hotel rooms/conventions and thousands more that come to downtown to “hangout, entertain, whatever”. Downtown is about one mile x one mile. All those people....... all those walets..... in one square mile..... No retail in a decade of trying........
    2 points
  7. Drove by yesterday and it really is coming together. Its going to be a nice addition and really a nice looking parking garage. Its a welcome change to some of our other new parking garages. Its just goes to show you that if a developer wants to put the money in and encourages his architect to create a more intriguing and attractive garage it can be done.
    2 points
  8. Comparing freeways to trains is a false equivalence, and even there was a equivalent, it would probably be to block, say, South Freeway from being built with federal funds (it was the last of the Houston freeways to be built). And even that's not entirely true, because Culberson didn't want rail going on Richmond and I think he even said something about being okay with METRO continuing to develop the light rail parallel to Westpark Tollway. But, METRO wanted Richmond because of better access and (projected) ridership numbers.
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Just because someone has a different opinion than you doesn’t mean they were paid to do so. It’s like the accusation that there’s funding for people to get paid while posting negative things about President Trump, but even if that’s true (we’re not here to argue that) does that mean that every negative comment on the Internet about Trump is because someone paid to do? Of course not. I’ve noticed your opinions about Trump on this website, were you paid to write them? If yes, I don’t think TxDOT or a shadowy but well-funded anti-transit "think tank" has people paid to say negative things about mass transit, and if not (the most likely answer though I can never tell for sure), then he's probably not paid by anyone either.
    1 point
  11. http://www.chron.com/life/home/design/article/Highrise-apartments-will-replace-La-Colombe-d-Or-12529317.php#photo-14947399 The historic ballroom of Montrose Boulevard's boutique hotel La Colombe d'Or will see its last waltz at a private party this weekend. Le Grand Salon de la Comtesse, an 18th-century Rococo room with walls of English oak paneling, gild-ed-frame mirrors and grand chandeliers. The salon is named for the French-Belgian princess La Comtesse Elisabeth Greffulhe, who is immortal-ized as a character in Marcel Proust's "Remembrance of Things Past." Oil tycoon John Mecom Sr. brought the 45x65 feet room over in pieces in the 1960s. His son sold it to Houston businessman Steve Zimmerman in the 1990s, who ensconced it in a stucco building adjacent to his hotel and restaurant. Starting Monday, it will be dismantled and stored to make way for a new 34-story luxury apartment building. What will happen to the old ballroom? The Zimmerman family is partnering with the global developer Hines and TH Real Estate to build the Residences a La Colombe d'Or, on the spot where the ballroom building currently sits. But La Colombe d'Or will stay at 3410 Montrose. Zimmerman will continue to operate the hotel, which will get a $10 mil-lion makeover and a restaurant upgrade. Residents and hotel guests in both buildings will share a slew of luxury amenities, including the tower's 10th-level swimming pool and the courtyard's sculptures, fountains and an outdoor fireplace. Hines tried to be as sensitive as possible to the property's historical asset, said Kevin Batchelor, senior managing director for Hines' southwest region. "The alternative would be to tear it down and build a bigger, clunkier building. Instead of using every square inch of land, we reduced the footprint and went slightly taller, but left room for parks, which enhances the connectivity."
    1 point
  12. I love our tunnels. I don't think the lack of signage helps though. It's bad enough that the restaurants are below ground but with no signs of you don't know they are there then... I would not discourage new tunnel access but I would definitely discourage new retail in tunnels. The activity underground is crazy. I think if the downtown worker mole people activity was visible on the surface that would entice non mole people to hang around downtown more. The surface is overrun by vagrants. Not until the mole people dilute the visibility of the vagrants will the non mole people enter the maze. New Orleans for example had tons of homeless in their business district. But they are less noticeable because there are so many workers on the street. And signs. We need signs. It's so freaking hard giving people directions to Whataburger. It shouldn't be so hard. You can hardly find a seat in that thing during lunch hour. They would make a killing with a street location in that big Whataburger building on 609 main
    1 point
  13. Pretty impressive for IAH to be in the same league as ORD, with only one airline rather than two.
    1 point
  14. There's an element of all that going on, sure, but most people don't care enough to be afraid. They're downtown because someone pays them to be there, and they are going to spend as little time there as they possibly can. If people chose a job downtown when they had a choice to be elsewhere, it's as likely that they did so for the park and ride as it was for anything else. They're not there because they want to be. It's no secret that Houston isn't exactly leading the charge on extra exercise, but even putting that tendency aside, most folks are either going to zap a Lean Cuisine in the office microwave or go to whatever Alonti-esque place is in their building and leave 10 minutes earlier than they otherwise would had they strolled around more. People will choose to live downtown more as some price/commuting pain inflection point. That will get things changing, and it's moving that way.
    1 point
  15. Our downtown workers, for the most part are a bunch of homogenized wimps. I don't understand they're mentality. They willing to risk their lives driving to work for 30- 45 minutes on our freeways, living in the highest rated crime areas - the suburbs, and yet they're either afraid to walk on the streets or maybe have to deal with the weather. They're like gerbils or hamsters in their tube cities. Don't they know that sunshine and vitamin D are good things and a little fresh air never hurt anyone. I don't know of any other city in America that has this kind of a paranoia. I know there are a few brave souls that do get out but its not a very high percentage. I know that if there were more opportunities and things for people to do it might have a positive affect. The city needs to promote outdoor activities at lunch, maybe scavenger hunts pitting companies against one another and force the buggers outside. Outdoor Concerts in Discovery Green or Allen center. This all comes back to the issue of more retail space on the surface that will draw people to them. I bet an Apple store downtown would do great business.
    1 point
  16. http://abc13.com/politics/documents-reveal-what-was-in-houstons-failed-amazon-bid/2988726/ Turner suggested future bids be controlled and run from city hall instead of other organizations, like the Houston Greater Partnership."Too many parts are controlling the whole," Turner said. "What has happened for too long and too many years is we have deferred. That time is no more."Turner said he was forming a task force to figure out what went wrong and how to improve in the future.
    1 point
  17. https://static1.squarespace.com/static/58cc240cbf629aaf4858104e/t/5a6a3a2fe2c4832bc70a699d/1516911160695/Braun+Enterprises+-+Heights+Waterworks.pdf Floyd Barbershop will be next to Hopdoddy
    1 point
  18. More rail is a lose lose proposition in Houston. Even if you build out rail to the extent DFW has, it will only be used by a fraction of the population, cost billions of dollars and probably increase overall traffic congestion because of it sharing the street with cars. Secondly, if your hope is improving Houston's national image (assuming you think more rail = better national image) then that will not change any either with light rail. The national media will still view Houston as a concrete jungle. Heavy rail cities consider light rail in a totally lower league. If we must throw away billions, then lets at least build a 20th century transportation system like maglev. Problem number one will remain unsolved, however, at least the image of public transportation in Houston will make some national headlines. Maglev triangle route with three stations; downtown, med center, galleria. Or even more national media attention can be acquired via a 21st century technology like a hpyerloop. But just more light rail will fail to serve the needs of the population and still won't improve or public transportation image, nationally.
    1 point
  19. I'm sure I've heard the argument on this very website that the green and purple lines (along with the red line extension) were supposed to make the light rail really cook, and now it will be the University line that needs to be built. And if that's anything less than a massive success, when is the answer NOT "we need to build more rail"? That's the funny thing--if I recall correctly, all Culberson did was block federal funding for the University Line, not actually block it itself (arguably, Culberson deserves some credit for actually fighting for his Afton Oaks-area constituents, a rare but admirable trait for a politician). It was METRO's choice not to build it. From the maps I've seen, it would've required them to clear out a small strip center and build over 59, so it's probably one of the more expensive routes to build, but if it was really pressing transit-wise (debatable) then METRO should've pushed for it, and that's on them.
    1 point
  20. Sorry, but ad hominem attacks on the arguer is a sign you know you can't win on the facts or logic. Keep it respectful and argue on the merits, not personal attacks. As far as myself, I've always argued *METRO* (not opponents) made a massive error of judgment when the used limited resources to build the green and purple lines when they should have prioritized the much more useful University line. But when Culberson blocked them, I'm guessing they figured they'd build what they could (ridership be damned) and just keep pointing to the network hole hoping to get another round of funding and authorization to build it.
    1 point
  21. Yes. And, I think the property between Washington and Center is seeing some excavation. I recall that being proposed as an apartment complex.
    1 point
  22. The green and purple lines are incomplete without the University Line. We have a central North-South Line but a mostly incomplete East-West one. But, max concrete knows that. That was part of the anti-transit lobby's plan all along. Kill the extension to the West where the major employment centers are and then use the lower than anticipated ridership numbers to the partially completed sections to keep it dead. It's hard to take anything he says seriously because it is in his name. He has a vested interest in killing alternative modes of travel. That said, ridership numbers for both the green and purple lines are increasing. The last two months we have figures for (Oct and Nov 2017) show that ridership is up over 400,000+ year-over year and that other than the months of August-September due to Harvey and multiple service interruptions, ridership is way up in 2017.
    1 point
  23. 20% parking reduction! Yaaaaasssss!
    1 point
  24. Bishop Arts project with 246 apartments planned in Oak Cliff Project Location
    1 point
  25. Growing DFW developer begins latest project near Kubota's U.S. headquarters in Grapevine JPI Project Location
    1 point
  26. Imo there is no better way to advertise than with beautiful art. This is gorgeous and eye catching.
    1 point
  27. They started working on the mural. Better then the blank wall, but seems odd they wouldn't want to advertise with all the cars that use Polk.
    1 point
  28. So the University line(or equivalent) is the only one we should consider building. University line ridership would have been a more compelling argument for future rail than green and purple.
    1 point
  29. When I was in college, I used to know a guy that was almost literally fresh off the farm. He took great delight in projecting an image of being a big, dumb hick when he was really one of the sharpest knives in the drawer, but he rarely reached the near-Andy Kaufman-like heights that he did during his first week on campus. Upon moving into one of the high-rise dorms, he had most of his classmates completely convinced that he'd never been in an elevator before when he went into a full-blown freakout the first time he followed a group of his peers into one and it started moving. I'm pretty sure there were similar instances of poker-faced chain-yanking that transpired related to other things commonly encountered in the Big City, but the elevator is the one that really jogged my memory.
    1 point
  30. I disagree, respectfully. Everything is moving in the right direction and downtown's future is very promising. Most of these new apartment projects have leased up quite well. All of the new hotels being built. The Astros and Rockets continue to have success, so the neighborhoods around them will continue to grow (I'm most excited with the potential around MMP). The wider sidewalks and infrastructure are now there along Dallas and Main which is important. Brookfield acquiring all of Houston Center is a good sign as they will activate the street level with retail/greenspace. The new south downtown park will catalyze the remaining blocks around it. There is a lot going for downtown and I honestly believe we are just scratching the surface for demand to live downtown. The great thing is a lot of the major Multifamily players got in on this first building cycle (TC, TC Residential, Hines, Finger, Camden, Marquette). As they all achieve high occupancy and have actual market data to analyze, I think many will look at second sites and new players will enter. I understand the retail/thriving downtown isn't here yet, but it is coming.
    1 point
  31. Talked with a worker, he said they have 5 floors of office left and 2 above that for utilities. They are working 7 days a week with 2 shifts.
    1 point
  32. http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Deal-of-the-Week-6871484.php
    1 point
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