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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/01/15 in all areas

  1. Sorry the lighting is a little off on these...the exposure was way off so I tried to bring them back into viewability.
    6 points
  2. I think yall are freaking out a little bit too much. MOST of the galleria area was like this until just recently. Don't worry, soon enough it will be gone.
    4 points
  3. That's an oddly specific niche you describe, which leads me to believe you're wrong.
    3 points
  4. Try Cafe Andes At Canal & Jensen. Strang space in a community center but the South American Cuisine is authentic and delicious...not to mention affordable. BYOB and close to downtown. Tuesday is tango night. Very cool.
    3 points
  5. http://houston-texas-us.blogspot.com/2015/10/crown-work.html
    3 points
  6. IIRC, that Jack in the Box was there before Micro Center occupied the space a block north where Amegy is going up. It's a commercial use, so zoning really doesn't have much to do with it one way or the other.
    2 points
  7. 2 points
  8. 2 points
  9. 2 points
  10. Contact with aliens may or may not occur between now and then too. This will have a big impact.
    1 point
  11. I was gonna say, go east. So many great authentic places to go.
    1 point
  12. 1960 was two lanes at the time with very little traffic. I didn't start driving in that area with any regularity until my folks moved out to Jersey Village in mid '73, but I don't recall Kuykendahl being an intersection of much consequence at the time, if any at all. I'm not sure if it even had a traffic light. Back then, pretty much the only development in the area was Champions a bit to the west. It would be fiction, but near that intersection would have been a good out of the way place to dispose of a body if that's the direction your book might be going.
    1 point
  13. this building is actually looking better then i orginally thought. the color scheme actually matches the surroundings, and this adds great walkabailty density in that area. If you think the bars and restaurants get busy now, wait till this goes into effect.
    1 point
  14. To reiterate since I'm not out and about at work right now, you're going to discourage any contributors if you're planning to write a book, and such a book is so ridiculously niche that it making a profit would be slim at best. So what can you do? 1. Do research. Go to the Houston library downtown and spend a day poring over old city directories, or use a library card and use the archives from 1985 on to build an idea what it was like. Take pictures. Write stories about those pictures and what you remember. "This concrete pad used to be a McDonald's, built in 19xx and closed in...." 2. Publish those on a website or blog, and advertise. It will be a labor of love, and keep advertisements to an absolute minimum (if at all). Use a blog or a domain of your own to prevent being swamped with noxious ads. Advertise your own blog by bringing up common topics, like John and abandoned roads, or Tori and the signs of 1980s/1990s Houston. 3. This should bring people to share their own stories or at least share some kind words.
    1 point
  15. houstonmidtown.com Should check it out. There's some great stuff going on in Midtown Houston. Back to the subject at hand.... this thread is about new Dallas development
    1 point
  16. Apparently, this man can predict 3 years in the future. The only thing that is "crystal clear" is that by 2018, oil prices will have stayed the same, doubled, tripled, been cut in half or been cut by three quarters. And, interest rates will be the same, up or down. Inflation will be the same, up or down. Employment will be the same, up or down. Global trade will be up, down, or the same and the dollar will be stronger, weaker, or about the same. Oh, and the national or local economy will be growing, shrinking, or about the same. All of those items impact the housing markets. So, the only thing that is "crystal clear" three years from now is that it is impossible to tell what "equalibrium" will be established, if any.
    1 point
  17. Hmmmm. Construction beginning "summer 2016" Sales office open in February of 2016. That gives them 6 months to sell, what?, 100+ units? (20% of the total?) in order to get their financing? 4 units a week, every week, for 6 months. That seems like an aggressive timeline to me.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. http://www.chron.com/about/article/East-Downtown-condo-project-would-offer-6601362.php
    1 point
  20. To me, rail in the South (and even West Coast) is like a bar in a supermarket that serves beer and wine by the glass. It's certainly only found in nice grocery stores (like Whole Foods though I think some regular HEB stores do it too) and I often wish there was one in my supermarket, but it's less important than other features, like having decent produce or a clean store. I'd be much less happy with it if it involved raising the prices in the store substantially, cutting selection, or otherwise compromising everything else, because I know it's not a necessity when grocery shopping. And once again Slick, you've undermined your own theory in your goalpost-changing arguments as to how rail is always the answer (I find it frankly amazing that you pretty much are the personification of what philosophically anti-rail opponents think pro-rail people are like). You stated that "rail has to be in the right corridors", citing the abandoned railroad right of ways in Dallas. While I'm not sure if that's the actual reason (I would say that because of spread-out job centers, using a "spider web" from downtown is less effective than it should be), it undermines the argument of putting rail down the center of 288 (and I believe you did say something against rail paralleling 59). But again, I'm not necessarily condemning the idea of tollroads or rail down 288 either way, I just don't like the idea that "we need rail", because as it stands, rail statistically won't help much in easing congestion (sorry), and it's not conducive to what public transit even stands for (transportation for the less advantaged).
    1 point
  21. "Hey guys! Hey guys guess what? Guess what? I know where things are going, and I could totally tell you...but I won't! Isn't that awesome?!" -swtsig
    1 point
  22. They are pulling the other crane down today. Sorry no photos, rain and dark is not a good time for that.
    1 point
  23. Adding anther floor likely pushed this thing over the 500 foot mark. Nice!
    1 point
  24. To the list above you can add: Irma's (2 locations) Guadalajara Three forks Mia Bella (Green Street) What's the name of the Tapas restaraunt next to Mia Bella? House of Blues Pappasitos Tejas Masa's (Lamar) Virtually every restaurant listed from the original list above and the edited lists is less than 10 blocks. Walk or take a fixed price $6 cab pride.
    1 point
  25. Barnabys closes way to early which is a flow imo. Sambuca is much over priced for the food quality, great spot for a drink and some music but dont like it for the food.
    1 point
  26. That's like Michael Berry going to the gay bar "for the beer."
    1 point
  27. I will never understand you people. People in uptown eat food so someone is going to be the supply to that demand.
    1 point
  28. Mas de Bobruss: Edit: Also, next door at the St. Luke's School
    1 point
  29. wouldn't be shocked to see that 50-story tower come to fruition if the first phases go well which i bet they do. Dallas' economy is flying high like Houston's was 18 months ago when we thought it would go on forever. biggest difference is that Dallas' economy is so much more diversified that a local "crash" is unlikely in anytime in the near future. of course they'll overbuild bc that's what every real estate boom does but good for them. and i agree that they generally get much stronger residential/hospitality architecture. for whatever reason over the past 25 years Houston has relegated itself to very cost-conscious and often banal aesthetics. how stucco ever got popular here is beyond me but it refuses to die.
    1 point
  30. I live in Midtown and work near Hobby. Note: I'm responding to this as though it's a serious question. With this board, anything can be thinly veiled sarcasm.
    1 point
  31. 10/27 http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Moving-in-Residential-surpasses-retail-in-ritzy-6599418.php#photo-8874188
    1 point
  32. Highways are not going to be the answer in all cases (especially long term), but I'm getting really sick of this dogmatic "we must build rail like East Coast cities or we are failures" mentality. There was a recent article in the Houston Chronicle ("Kotkin, Cox: Light rail in the Sun Belt is a poor fit") that just seemed to prove an ugly fact--unless you're a Eastern seaboard, old-line "legacy" city, rail doesn't seem to work. Even Portland, San Diego, and L.A. have actually seen transit numbers decrease since rail was implemented. Just because Gattis doesn't subscribe the popular urban theories du jour (like New Urbanism) doesn't mean he doesn't try to think of innovative solutions or that he's wrong.
    1 point
  33. Heavy rail to the burbs should also service inside the loop as well. Light rail is great for connecting with the many smaller stops they have, but a heavy rail system that serves the burbs should connect with every employement center. I imagine Light Rail from Downtown to the galleria could take 45 minutes, especially if on the surface, sharing space with the roads. With a heavy rail system it could cut that time into a fraction. Which is what we need!
    1 point
  34. Via Flickr: Untitled by Javi Kawai, on Flickr Untitled by Javi Kawai, on Flickr
    1 point
  35. I've probably had more than 40 such anniversaries...but then I mostly grew up in the southeast.
    1 point
  36. Therein lies the rub. Inner city housing (read that to mean near major job centers) has become prohibitively expensive in Houston. Commuters from new communities on the outskirts of Houston can expect 45 minutes to an hour on a good day and up to two hours on a bad day - each way. You mentioned more bus service earlier. I don't understand what the fetish is with grade seperated commuter bus routes when the word "train" implies multiple bus like coaches being pulled together. I have talked to other people (in leadership positions) who are offended at the thought of having trains deliver shoppers and workers to their doorstep every day. It's as though they can't grasp that there are six million people in the region, the roads are massive, and are still jammed. Why not jam more busses in the mix to make things interesting? The way I see this is that it isn't so much an urbanist utopian dream of everyone taking trains and living in disneyland-like villages, but a way to preserve the value proposition the brings so many people to Houston. You get plenty of space with access to big city amenities for a low price which makes for a great value. The schools have left the picture, which isn't unique to Houston. What is more threatening is the loss of access to the city itself, which will ultimately starve the city of Houston of the employment growth, tax base, and commerce that it needs to pay its bills.
    1 point
  37. Photos courtesy of Bobruss: Sacrificing his own garage for the betterment of the Menil.
    1 point
  38. I can remember a couple of months ago how everyone was so upset with the glass on this building. I for one think it looks great and I too love the reflective qualities of this surface. It may be a short building but it does so much for this block. The curves, setbacks and footprint will create an exciting space for downtown. Where it will be most apparent is from the ground when you walk into this open space. I hope they have something nice planned for the Travis side where the building sets back from the curb due to the curve of the building. It would be nice to liven up the Travis side. Then eventually when they tear down the old Foleys garage and build a super tall it will all make sense.
    1 point
  39. The reflection of the skyline... excellent.
    1 point
  40. Photos thanks to Houston Streetwise Blog http://houston-texas-us.blogspot.com/2015/10/kirby-collection-groundbreaking-pics.html
    1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. During the late 60's I had went dancing there a few times myself. A local country act Bud and Bud the Hooper twins played there some as well as some other great bands that I can no longer remember the names of. Can't remember for sure but I think this picture was made at the gardens circa 1969.
    1 point
  43. The fees were always just a small part of the Rebuild Houston campaign. The bigger thing was that we would have a dedicated fund for road and drainage repairs. So they could have raised taxes to pay for it; or cut spending like you said. Personally, I'd like to see them drop the fees down to the originally promised $5 average, and then close the gaps in two ways: 1: Get a cut of the fees for vehicles registered in the City of Houston. As I have said from the beginning, Rebuild Houston is not just about drainage. It's about roads, too. So why not get money from automobile registrations? The Green folks would love it, too - since they want people to have fewer cars. 2: Due to a fluke in State Law, private universities are required to be exempt from the fee. The City needs to take a lead from Boston MA, and aggressively seek voluntary payments from the Universities, to help cover what should be their share of the fees. (The "payments" could be that the Universities actually use their own money and contractors to repair public roads and drainage through and around campus).
    1 point
  44. Gulfgate got some air time yesterday on channel 13, a piece on the East End mgmt district and Precint 6 partnership to put in a storefront and patrols, resulting in the lowest crime incidence of any mall in Houston. I don't know if there should be some distinction between a 'mall', like the Galleria or Memorial City, and a shopping center, like Gulfgate. And, wouldn't it be much easier to manage crime in surface lots than parking garages? Greenspoint, to no one's surpise, topped the list. Don't they have an HPD storefront inside the mall? Perhaps they don't have patrols.
    1 point
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