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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/16/13 in all areas

  1. I made a quick chart to compare 400ft+ buildings in Houston vs L.A., and realized that Houston has alot more taller buildings. Few observations: -- L.A.'s US Bank Tower is a mere 16ft taller than Houston's tallest JP Morgan Chase. -- Houston has 49 buildings vs 34 in L.A. -- Houston only has 3 buildings shorter than LA's shortest two (+/- 5 ft) -- For each of L.A.'s buildings on this chart, draw a line to the right from the top of each bar, and count how many taller buildings there are in Houston -- this compares buildings within a similar range and shows how many more Houston has. Exceptions: --This list of buildings includes those outside of the immediate downtown area. I am not sure how spread out the buildings in LA are, but a good bit of the Houston buildings are in the Galleria area (i.e., Williams Tower). So this may not be a fair comparison of downtown skylines. Anyone more familiar with Houston/L.A., please advise which buildings are not in the downtown skylines and I can update this chart. Source: Wikipedia Los Angeles Houston
    2 points
  2. These are great examples of how additions should be done. From my perspective, the exterior physical materials are less relevant to making the house "historic" than the style and proportion of the house. The biggest problem with the historic ordinance is that it forces additions to take on strange and ridiculous camelback proportions that would never have been built when the homes were originally constructed. On the other hand, these additions are far less noticeable and don't stick out like a sore thumb. Even better, they provide a house with better flow and allow the homeowners to preserve more yard space by centering the house rather than pushing most of the addition awkwardly to the back yard.
    2 points
  3. When you drive by this thing, with how close it is to the street corner it looks huge, and it's only 5 floors high... 35 to go! And I'll get some shots soon from a completely different angle atop another nearby building, where you can really see it impact the skyline (not the AT&T building unfortunately, haha) OK, now that I promised I'd do this, hopefully that'll lock me in to actually getting it done!
    2 points
  4. Not sure if you call it a highrise, but Emporis would... the 12 story Hanover Tower in Rice Village is moving forward. The garden store and small apartment building are now vacant and fenced off. Demolition should start very soon.
    1 point
  5. Now you are using facts/logic to argue with preservationists....the preservationist loathe facts & logic. They fight with emotion, emotion, no matter how illogical, can never be wrong. The ordinance is about control and property values...if you control the structures, you control the value. Its not about preservation, history, or anything else. Its a very vocal minority attempting to assert control over people who just want to go on about their lives. S3MH says we "cant get the political support to repeal" the ordinance - but that is a half truth....the support is there, the political environment is not. To repeal something is very different than enacting it, and everything is politics....this is a very insignificant issue in Houston, its just significant in our neighborhood. The council, the HAHC, everyone is making sure that everyone who appeals wins - that is not coincidental. To appeal costs money, if you have the money to appeal and to stage the fight, then you probably have the money to sue too - As it is right now, there is an argument that the ordinance has not actually caused anyone harm...without harm or damages there is no standing to sue...It will most likely take someone being denied at the appeal level to gain standing. If the council just approves everyone, the ordinance can not be judically over-turned, which is why everything gets approved. It takes money to win, and so far not enough of it has been ponied up. The support for the districts, and the ordinance is nowhere near what the preservationist would have you believe it is...they used dirty methods and trickery to enact the ordinance, more & more people who later find out they are harmed by this will continue to drop their "support" for this ordinance. I see it daily, as more and more families want more space without moving out of the area. The ordinance IS anti-family, and while it IS possible to live in a small space, very very few people want to do so....especially those who have the money to live where they want and in the house of their choice, like so many Heights residents.
    1 point
  6. Thankfully your generation is marginalized with time and the new generation has different ideas.
    1 point
  7. agreed. its just a solid foundation. of course the busses that are getting replaced would be rerouted along the commuter rail stations to support those localized regions/suburbs. but back to your point, Houston is projected to have 10 million people by 2040. our highway system cannot handle another 3.5 million people without vastly expanding it, which we really dont have the room to do. we need alternative modes of transportation. rail is the most viable alternative. its about time Houston accepts it. oh how could i forget. in addition to the light rail/commuter rail/high speed rail i had in the plan i would add streetcars. the East End already has plans under review for a streetcar system to help expand the area that the light rail is able to serve, and support localized living around the east end. 2 of the 3 routes also ran down one of the streets futher south side in downtown, ending near the main street line. in addition to the east end streetcar system, i think midtown is a great candidate for a streetcar system since it is one of the more walkable and urban districts in Houston. linking it into the surrounding light rail to further enhance access to the system.
    1 point
  8. We can do better. We Have to do it better.
    1 point
  9. my plan wasnt including the "Future Rail Extensions". i dont think light rail should much further than 610, with the exception of Hobby Airport. Bush can have a commuter rail (which i forgot to mention in my first post), since light rail is too slow and expensive to go that far of a distance. the high speed rail terminal at the hardy rail yards could easily suit a highspeed rail line to San Antonio/Austin in the future to complete the Texas triangle (since TxDot is studying the San Antonio - Dallas route and of course the private Japanese company is planning the Dallas - Houston route), since the Hardy Rail Yards site is just off of i10 and a few rail lines that come into that area from the west. one of the rail lines that runs directly to the lot is the line that ends up running along the Hempstead highway so that would be a perfect connection for the 290 commuter rail or the high speed rail to Austin or San Antonio. of course the trains would have to slow down in the city. what do you guys think about the proposal to turn the "downtown loop" of 45/59/and 10 (i think?) into a one direction counterclockwise loop to hopefully better manage traffic?
    1 point
  10. The interior layout was ...awkward. The bar was fine, but then they put oversized couches against the inside wall that were too far apart for a group of people to talk to each other.
    1 point
  11. It doesn't really matter whether or not you think a 3000 square foot house is un-necessary. That's totally up to the property owner, and it should not be any of your concern. And I say that as someone who lives in a 1400 square foot 2 bed one bath house with a wife and child. Scale is irrelevant, unless it's your property.
    1 point
  12. I flew from Sugar Land to IAH on Metro Airlines a number of times in the early 80's. They flew a Twin Otter, and if you connected to Eastern, the flight was essentially free. An added bonus was the free parking at the Sugar Land airport.
    1 point
  13. Not intending to argue with Brie. I have made a few responses for the benefit of others who apparently are waiting on pins and needles for me to respond.
    1 point
  14. Just for kicks I did a similar comparison to Chicago...
    1 point
  15. So, it looks like they are filling in the joints of whatever the exterior covering/sheeting is. Perhaps it is not so temporary as I thought. There were also workers working on putting a brick pattern on to a section of it. Without knowing exactly what every step has been, it is tough to say definitively, but it looks like it will be faux brick exterior.
    1 point
  16. Taken just a few hours ago: Sent from my iPhone5 using Tapatalk 2
    1 point
  17. SUVs have many purposes. They were overused by some, but that doesn't diminish their usefulness for other purposes. You seem to have a very shallow research capability, followed by enormous leaps of logic, generally to conclusions that you wish to be true. For instance, while bemoaning the poor and their use of cars, you ignore that they can use that car to reach many better paying jobs, such as construction, that your beloved trains cannot reach. In some cases buses might reach the job, but you criticize buses as well. I also have this sneaking suspicion that while criticizing cars, you likely secretly drive one yourself.
    1 point
  18. SUV's are enormously useful under certain circumstances. I'm sure you could go on and on about what the most unfortunate inventions are, but an SUV isn't one of them. And yet the poor in our country are richer than most other people in the world so I'd say we'd get a pretty good grade on that. http://www.oregonlive.com/hovde/index.ssf/2012/08/income_in_perspective_americas.html
    1 point
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