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Triton

W. 11th and Nicholson St

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801 W. 11th St., Houston Heights, Houston, 77008

 

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HERE’S A GHOST-DOTTED sketch of what may soon inhabit that empty lot at the northwest corner of W. 11th and Nicholson streets; Adolfo Pesquera notes over on VBX that the project’s developers may break ground soon. (That’s both figuratively and literally — there’s a fair bit of concrete and asphalt removalinvolved in the job.) The medical-themed project is catty-corner from the 2-story building already housing the Heights Clinic (along with a Stewart Title office). There should be some kind of grassy buffer between the 31,010-sq.-ft. building and and the rail-turned-trail Heights hike & bike path running along Nicholson to the east, as well as a bit of open to the west toward recently openedPresidio

http://swamplot.com/second-multistory-medical-office-to-join-the-hike-bike-scenery-at-w-11th-st/2017-04-19/

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This confirms my suspicions that developers and architects never set foot in the communities where they build much less even look at a map.  Why in the world would you design a building that faces due south with tons of big windows?  Yeah, I know the low e windows are great, but they only do so much and you still have to have giant shades to keep people from being blinded by the sun.  

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or look at the buildings around them...i hope this is just a simple concept rendering, and not at all what the final design will be.  looks like a suburban, low cost office box.

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1 hour ago, s3mh said:

This confirms my suspicions that developers and architects never set foot in the communities where they build much less even look at a map.  Why in the world would you design a building that faces due south with tons of big windows?  Yeah, I know the low e windows are great, but they only do so much and you still have to have giant shades to keep people from being blinded by the sun.  

 

This makes me wonder if you have ever set foot in this community.  ;-)  In Houston, south-facing windows are much less of a problem than east-facing and west-facing windows.

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23 minutes ago, Houston19514 said:

 

This makes me wonder if you have ever set foot in this community.  ;-)  In Houston, south-facing windows are much less of a problem than east-facing and west-facing windows.

 Look at the rendering.  It is an office building.  Anyone working there will have the sun in their face from 10 am to 4 pm.  That is why our founding fathers built the downtown street grid like a diamond on a N/S axis.

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2 hours ago, s3mh said:

 Look at the rendering.  It is an office building.  Anyone working there will have the sun in their face from 10 am to 4 pm.  That is why our founding fathers built the downtown street grid like a diamond on a N/S axis.

 

I did look at the rendering.  I realize it is an office building.  That does not change the path of the sun.  You are wrong about their having sun in their faces from 10 am to 4 pm.  That might be correct for a couple months in winter, but not so much the rest of the year.  (Besides which, the vast majority of people working in offices do not sit facing the window.)  South-facing windows are the most energy-efficient for buildings in Houston.  (And are you really saying that our founding fathers built the downtown street grid so that office workers wouldn't have sun in their faces?  That's a good one.  Never heard anything like that before.  Most historians believer they just laid out the streets roughly parallel and perpendicular to Buffalo Bayou.)

Edited by Houston19514
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The angle of the grid likely had more to do with prevailing winds than anything.  East and West are the bad directions for sun. South can be dealt with by some minimal window shades.

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16 hours ago, Ross said:

The angle of the grid likely had more to do with prevailing winds than anything.  East and West are the bad directions for sun. South can be dealt with by some minimal window shades.

I worked in an office that was east facing, and my desk was also east facing.  I had an arc of sticky notes on the window to trace the path of the sun, and sometimes needed to wear sunglasses to get anything done

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