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Meyerland Plaza

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BigFootsSocks    2757

This is right on the fringe of transformation of this area, and will be a nice sight too see as the areas around here begin to redevelop.

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brian0123    360

This is right on the fringe of transformation of this area, and will be a nice sight too see as the areas around here begin to redevelop.

The area around Meyerland Plaza is full of million dollar mansions so I would say it's well beyond redeveloped. This shopping center is the only thing lagging in this area.
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txn4art    17

The area around Meyerland Plaza is full of million dollar mansions so I would say it's well beyond redeveloped. This shopping center is the only thing lagging in this area.

 

Although the previous renovation job on Meyerland Plaza is outmoded, I don't think many of the stores there are suffering for lack of customers. Even people who live in million dollar mansions shop at places like Target, Bed Bath and Beyond, SteinMart, etc. Anyone who wants upper-end merchandise will find plenty of options just a short drive away in the Galleria, Highland Village and adjacent shopping districts.

 

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brian0123    360

Although the previous renovation job on Meyerland Plaza is outmoded, I don't think many of the stores there are suffering for lack of customers. Even people who live in million dollar mansions shop at places like Target, Bed Bath and Beyond, SteinMart, etc. Anyone who wants upper-end merchandise will find plenty of options just a short drive away in the Galleria, Highland Village and adjacent shopping districts.

Sorry, I was trying to say that the demographics of the area will easily support even more retail in this area. The current options are great but the center itself feels tired and the layout is built around the car. I'd also love to see more restaurants and retail fill up some of the concrete sea around it.

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H-E-B is relocating its Meyerland area grocery store to Meyerland Plaza.

From RealtyNews:
 


H-E-B Grocery Co. is expected to announce the construction of a new 100,000-SF store at Meyerland Plaza, a retail center at the southwest corner of Loop 610 and Beechnut, Realty News Report has learned.


The new Meyerland store will help H-E-B to fill a void that arose when the H-E-B at Chimney Rock and South Braeswood flooded in Hurricane Harvey.

The new Meyerland Plaza H-E-B, if all proceeds according to plans, is expected to be a two-story facility. The retail portion of the structure, is expected to be between 95,000 and 100,000 SF. The grocery store is expected to be built on the west side of Meyerland Plaza, near JC Penney.


http://realtynewsreport.com/2017/10/31/fidelis-realty-expected-to-build-h-e-b-store-at-meyerland-plaza/

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More on H-E-B's relocation Meyerland Plaza and the build-out

The new structure H-E-B is planning there, Bivins says, would be 2 stories; if the configuration is similar to the company’s new Bellaire and Heights locations, that would mean the store itself would be built on the second floor, on top of a parking-only lower level.

 

http://swamplot.com/a-double-decker-h-e-b-for-meyerland-plaza/2017-10-31/

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I couldn't find a rendering of the planned H-E-B Meyerland Plaza, but I can't wait to see how the design looks. Meyerland Plaza is prone to flooding, so I'm wondering why there will be first floor parking? Wouldn't it be more feasible and better in the long run (due to the area's known flooding problems) to leave the first floor has a loading area with a ramp leading to second floor parking? The grocery store could be on the second floor too or on a third floor (or both!).

 

From a layman's point of view, I avoid areas like Meyerland Plaza were the surface parking lot is known to flood during big and fast-moving rain storms. On the off chance I'm caught out in a torrential rain while I'm inside shopping or if I worked there, I'd feel safer knowing my car would be less likely to receive flood damage in an elevated parking structure. I think developers of retail, regular apartments, and mid-to-hi-rise residences should eliminate underground (like the Calais at Cortlandt Square in Midtown), surface, and first floor parking and focus on elevated parking with Houston's flooding in mind for future projects.

Edited by CrockpotandGravel

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Fringe    326
16 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:

I couldn't find a rendering of the planned H-E-B Meyerland Plaza, but I can't wait to see how the design looks. Meyerland Plaza is prone to flooding, so I'm wondering why there will be first floor parking? Wouldn't it be more feasible and better in the long run (due to the area's known flooding problems) to leave the first floor has a loading area with a ramp leading to second floor parking? The grocery store could be on the second floor too or on a third floor (or both!).

 

From a layman's point of view, I avoid areas like Meyerland Plaza were the surface parking lot is known to flood during big and fast-moving rain storms. On the off chance I'm caught out in a torrential rain while I'm inside shopping or if I worked there, I'd feel safer knowing my car would be less likely to receive flood damage in an elevated parking structure. I think developers of retail, regular apartments, and mid-to-hi-rise residences should eliminate underground (like the Calais at Cortlandt Square in Midtown), surface, and first floor parking and focus on elevated parking with Houston's flooding in mind for future projects.

Ha. Although that would be nice I'm sure the last thing developers are worried about is keeping your car dry. 

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Texasota    828

Which is exactly correct. Cars can move. Car storage is exactly the kind of thing that should be put in flood-prone areas (if you're going to put anything there at all), rather than an actual use like housing or retail.

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On 11/1/2017 at 2:54 PM, Fringe said:

Ha. Although that would be nice I'm sure the last thing developers are worried about is keeping your car dry. 


You're right. That's the last thing developers are worried about, but that should be something they should implement. I don't fault them 100% because this is something the city should require developers to implement. Flooding is going to happen in Houston (and it's only going to get worse with climate change). The city has to put the citizens well-being in mind. One of those many changes should include eliminating surface parking and put elevated parking structures for all apartments, large shopping centers and malls. New projects like this new HEB at Meyerland Plaza could be a good starting point.

 

Off subject slightly: I told most of my family and warned people on Facebook before Harvey hit that they may want to think about parking their vehicles in multi-story parking garage and Uber home. I knew this storm was going to cause major flooding and ruin lots of cars. Some garages waived fees, but for those that didn't, the cost of paying per day may have seem high in the short run for lots of people, but it's cheaper than paying for towing, buying a new car or repairs, and dealing with your insurance.

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Twitter1    623

Retail Wrap: Meyerland Plaza gets $93 million loan for refinancing

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Meyerland-Plaza-gets-93M-loan-for-refinancing-12293372.php

 

A joint venture of Fidelis Realty Partners has obtained a $93 million loan to refinance Meyerland Plaza, an 860,308-square-foot retail center at the southwest corner of the West Loop South and Beechnut. JLL Capital Markets, led by Tom Fish, Jimmy Board and Molly Leinsdorf, secured the loan through John Hancock. Tenants include a J.C. Penney store, Palais Royal, Bed Bath & Beyond, Target, Ross Dress for Less, Marshall's, Best Buy, Chick-fil-A, Saltgrass Steakhouse and Beck's Prime. Fidelis, in partnership with BlackRock, acquired the property from Ronus Properties in 2013. The 1957 center was redeveloped by Ed Wulfe in the mid-1990s.

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