andre154

Nicholson @W 20th by Alliance Residential Heights Waterworks Reservoir, 2 Tracts)

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On 11/29/2016 at 8:22 PM, Angostura said:

 

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22 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:

 

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The burger bar going in building A of the Braun Enterprises redevelopment of Heights Waterworks is supposedly Hopdoddy Burger Bar. I don't know if it's true but a friend of a friend says they've been in negotiations for a while and it's a sure thing. I don't know about the yoga studio next door to it, but I'll ask.

And the Tex-Mex restaurant going in building B is going to be a Ford Fry restaurant.

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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On 7/16/2017 at 8:21 AM, CrockpotandGravel said:

And the Tex-Mex restaurant going in building B is going to be a Ford Fry restaurant.



From Eater Houston about the possible Tex-Mex restaurant opening in Heights Waterworks (may be The El Felix, Superica, or something else). No confirmation, just speculation, but there is a LLC for a Heights Tex-Mex restaurant from Ford Fry.


 

Back in May, Eater reported that State of Grace owner and restaurateur Ford Fry appeared to be plotting an expansion in Houston. Now, more details have emerged that point to plans to open a Tex-Mex restaurant in the Heights.
 

It was originally reported that Fry was considering taking over the location that formerly housed Bernadine’s, but a representative for the restaurant wouldn’t confirm whether or not that space had been secured. Now, a limited liability corporation for an entity called “Houston Heights TexMex, LLC” has been registered with the Texas Secretary of State by none other than Ford Fry Restaurants partner and chief financial officer Daniel Van Loh.
 

He might be bringing sand to the desert, but Fry is a Texas native with plenty of experience in cooking Tex-Mex. Ford Fry Restaurants currently operates a Tex-Mex restaurant called Superica, with two locations in Georgia and a third in the works for Charlotte, NC. Superica serves up a menu of Tex-Mex standards, including a version of the famed Bob Armstrong Dip from Matt’s El Rancho in Austin, fajitas, enchiladas, and San Antonio-style puffy tacos. Unfortunately, there aren’t any details connecting Superica to Houston just yet.
 

As far as location is concerned, rumors on the Houston Architecture Information Forum suggest that the mysterious Tex-Mex eatery could land at one of the buildings set aside for restaurant space at the forthcoming Heights Water Works development, near Ascension Coffee.

https://houston.eater.com/2017/7/17/15979212/houston-ford-fry-superica-tex-mex-restaurant-rumors

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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That's a pretty impressive set of tenants so far.

 

It looks like they're meeting their parking requirements fully on-site. Depending on the final square footages and use classifications, with the 40% break for historical buildings (provided they get a CoA), they'll need something between 120 and 130, which is about what's on the site plan. I was hoping for structured parking here, as it would let them re-purpose some of the land used for parking at the Harold's development, but I guess they couldn't make those numbers work.

 

 

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54 minutes ago, Angostura said:

I was hoping for structured parking here, as it would let them re-purpose some of the land used for parking at the Harold's development, but I guess they couldn't make those numbers work.


I was hoping for structured parking too. What's being proposed won't be enough for surface parking. This development will bring in people from all parts of town, and there needs to be structured parking to provide enough room and limit the number of parked cars on the street.

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2 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:


I was hoping for structured parking too. What's being proposed won't be enough for surface parking. This development will bring in people from all parts of town, and there needs to be structured parking to provide enough room and limit the number of parked cars on the street.

 

Both Nicholson and 20th are no-parking. 19th has a couple dozen street spaces, but probably not enough to absorb demand, especially with the 40% break they'll get for re-developing historic buildings. So some of the people that park on the street will have to do so on 18th and 21st.

 

There are also surface lots for the hospital at 19th & Ashland and 20th & Ashland that could be developed if Braun were to go vertical here.

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8 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:


I was hoping for structured parking too. What's being proposed won't be enough for surface parking. This development will bring in people from all parts of town, and there needs to be structured parking to provide enough room and limit the number of parked cars on the street.

 

Why is limiting cars parked on the street a good thing? If there's street parking available than that's exactly what's it's for, and I have to imagine that the vast majority of Heights residents have off-street parking.

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There's already a four story parking deck across the street for the Heights Medical Tower that I bet doesn't get much use in the evenings and on weekends.  Maybe they could arrange something with those guys.

 

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12 hours ago, Texasota said:

 

Why is limiting cars parked on the street a good thing? If there's street parking available than that's exactly what's it's for, and I have to imagine that the vast majority of Heights residents have off-street parking.


Streets in that neighborhood shouldn't be clogged up with parked cars IMO. There should be more parking set aside for businesses. With the Heights growing by the day, centralized parking structures are needed to accommodate people coming into the Heights to patron these businesses. 

 

34 minutes ago, innerloop said:

There's already a four story parking deck across the street for the Heights Medical Tower that I bet doesn't get much use in the evenings and on weekends.  Maybe they could arrange something with those guys.

 

Hopefully they can. That would be a great alternative.

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Every off street parking space takes away space for an actual business, residence, or other use. What is the negative impact of using on-street parking as much as possible? Again, if most people who live in the Heights have off-street parking (which has certainly been my experience) then non-residents aren't really competing directly with residents for these spaces.

 

Not to harp on this, but I really think it's important. There has to be a reason for streets not to be "clogged up" with cars. Is it aesthetic? Is it speed? And is it a good enough reason to waste an existing resource and shift the burden onto individual businesses? Is it a good enough reason to exchange additional space for parking rather than an actual use? 

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14 hours ago, Texasota said:

 

Why is limiting cars parked on the street a good thing? If there's street parking available than that's exactly what's it's for, and I have to imagine that the vast majority of Heights residents have off-street parking.

 

I don't have any issue with street parking. It's just that of the 3 streets bordering this development, 2 don't have any.

 

I think the missed opportunity is that instead of 3 surface lots (this development, NW corner of 19th and Ashland, SE corner of 20th and Ashland) we could have one parking structure and two new developments, bringing a lot more density to this retail corridor. Between the waterworks and whatever goes on the Chase site, we could finally have a continuous corridor of street-facing buildings from Yale to Shepherd.

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2 hours ago, innerloop said:

There's already a four story parking deck across the street for the Heights Medical Tower that I bet doesn't get much use in the evenings and on weekends.  Maybe they could arrange something with those guys.

 

 

There are provisions in the ordinance for shared parking requirements, but, effectively, if the restaurants open before 5PM, they can't use that garage to meet any of their minimum parking requirement. They CAN, however, lease up to 50-70% of the parking spaces for overflow after 5PM, depending on the actual use classification of that building.

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1 hour ago, Texasota said:

Every off street parking space takes away space for an actual business, residence, or other use. What is the negative impact of using on-street parking as much as possible? Again, if most people who live in the Heights have off-street parking (which has certainly been my experience) then non-residents aren't really competing directly with residents for these spaces.

 

Not to harp on this, but I really think it's important. There has to be a reason for streets not to be "clogged up" with cars. Is it aesthetic? Is it speed? And is it a good enough reason to waste an existing resource and shift the burden onto individual businesses? Is it a good enough reason to exchange additional space for parking rather than an actual use? 

 

Personally, I'd much rather have more street parking and fewer surface lots. However, most residential streets in the Heights are not quite wide enough to accommodate street parking on both sides and still allow two-way traffic to flow normally. This is not normally a problem when only 1/4 to 1/3 of the available street spaces are in use, since there's usually enough room for one car to pull over and let an oncoming vehicle pass. However, when parking volumes are high, navigating these streets becomes difficult.

 

There are three potential solutions to this:

 

1 - Repave streets with curbs and gutters to allow more space for street parking. This is the most expensive option.

 

2 - Restrict street parking to one side of the street only. This eliminates half the on-street spaces, including spaces that residents use on a regular basis. Often spaces they've paid money to improve (like placing a culvert in the drainage ditch).

 

3 - Convert streets in the Heights from two-way to one-way. This maintains all the on-street spaces and eliminates any issues with flow of vehicles during peak parking demand. Many urban neighborhoods with a high usage rate of on-street parking have one-way side streets. In Houston, a big chunk of the 4th ward (the area bounded by Gray, Taft, Dallas and I-45) is laid out with one-way streets to allow on-street parking despite the narrow right-of-way.

 

In this particular area, the N-S streets are mostly OK for street parking (except Nicholson). Converting the E-W streets to one-way from 16th to 28th (maybe with the exception of 19th and 20th) would resolve the problem. East of Heights Blvd, I think you could make an argument for converting the entire street grid, from I-10 to 20th between Heights and Studewood, to one-way traffic.

 

 

 

 

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On 7/16/2017 at 8:21 AM, CrockpotandGravel said:

The burger bar going in building A of the Braun Enterprises redevelopment of Heights Waterworks is supposedly Hopdoddy Burger Bar. I don't know if it's true but a friend of a friend says they've been in negotiations for a while and it's a sure thing.




Hopdoddy Burger Bar is "officially confirmed" but unlike Eater Houston, CultureMap failed to include this forum as a source. Houstonia, Houston Chronicle, Houston Business Journal, and Houston Press does that too. Is it too much for them to give this site acknowledgement?


 

The Heights' status as Houston's hottest destination for new restaurant openings shows no signs of slowing down. This year alone, new arrivals like Field & Tides, Helen in the Heights, Presidio, and Alice Blue have helped the neighborhood maintain its status as the city's richest source of new openings, and the pace looks to continue next year with more restaurants on the way.
 

Hopdoddy will join Dallas-based coffee shop Ascension at the Heights Waterworks development, real estate developer Braun Enterprises announced. The restaurant will occupy 4,000-square feet of space in a building that will be constructed along 19th Street. The timeline on these projects is always tricky, but Wolf estimates the restaurant will open in the fall of 2018. Frank Seely represented Hopdoddy in the transaction.
 

"We have been big fans of Hopdoddy since visiting them in Austin years ago," Braun leasing director Zachary Wolf tells CultureMap. "They provide a high quality product and a family-friendly atmosphere that will fit perfectly in the Heights.

“We chose to open a Hopdoddy in the Heights because we received several requests from current guests to open in the area and it is such a vibrant and welcoming community," brand manager Erin Fohn tells CultureMap. "Hopdoddy is so excited to join this wonderful neighborhood.”


http://houston.culturemap.com/news/restaurants-bars/07-18-17-hopdoddy-burger-bar-opens-heights-waterworks-fall-2018-braun-enterprises

 

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CultureMap asked Braun about the Ford Fry Tex Mex restaurant:

 

CultureMap also asked Wolf is he had any comment on Eater Houston's recent report on rumors that State of Grace owner Ford Fry has plans to open a Tex-Mex restaurant called Superica at the Waterworks.
 

"I know nothing," he replied. Count that as a rumor for now, but expect more tenant announcements soon.

http://houston.culturemap.com/news/restaurants-bars/07-18-17-hopdoddy-burger-bar-opens-heights-waterworks-fall-2018-braun-enterprises/#slide=0

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4 hours ago, Texasota said:

Every off street parking space takes away space for an actual business, residence, or other use. What is the negative impact of using on-street parking as much as possible? Again, if most people who live in the Heights have off-street parking (which has certainly been my experience) then non-residents aren't really competing directly with residents for these spaces.

 

Not to harp on this, but I really think it's important. There has to be a reason for streets not to be "clogged up" with cars. Is it aesthetic? Is it speed? And is it a good enough reason to waste an existing resource and shift the burden onto individual businesses? Is it a good enough reason to exchange additional space for parking rather than an actual use? 

 

All very good points, and I would also point out that on-street parking reduces the amount of paving and thus reduces flooding over the long term.

 

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8 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:

Hopdoddy Burger Bar is "officially confirmed" but unlike Eater Houston, CultureMap failed to include this forum as a source. Houstonia, Houston Chronicle, Houston Business Journal, and Houston Press does that too. Is it too much for them to give this site acknowledgement?\


There are multiple reasons why the nickname "CultureCrap" is popular among denizens of many online fora. 

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12 hours ago, mkultra25 said:


There are multiple reasons why the nickname "CultureCrap" is popular among denizens of many online fora. 


I'm beginning to see why.

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