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Kphelps56

Good house - bad neighborhood?

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Kphelps56    0

What does everyone think of those new developments going up in traditionally bad neighborhoods? I.e. North of downtown and off navigation. My husband and I are looking for our first home and have found that we can't afford the young areas we want like the Heights, Midtown, and and Montrose.

However, these new, cheap, neighborhoods still in the loop are bright and shiny but surrounded by "sketchy" areas. Is it a risky investment?? We really want to start renting out the house when we can afford a nicer one.

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JLWM8609    464

What does everyone think of those new developments going up in traditionally bad neighborhoods? I.e. North of downtown and off navigation. My husband and I are looking for our first home and have found that we can't afford the young areas we want like the Heights, Midtown, and and Montrose.

However, these new, cheap, neighborhoods still in the loop are bright and shiny but surrounded by "sketchy" areas. Is it a risky investment?? We really want to start renting out the house when we can afford a nicer one.

 

 

Those areas in "traditionally bad neighborhoods" are probably not as bad as you think they are. The Heights, Midtown, and Montrose aren't immune to crime. You can get assaulted, robbed, and have your home invaded in just about any neighborhood in town. People get a false sense of security when they live in so called non sketchy areas like the areas you listed. When crime hits their neighborhood, you'll often see residents get on TV and say "That never happens here." Well, it does. You have to be cautious wherever you live.  

Edited by JLWM8609
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largeTEXAS    272

I'm a big fan of the neighborhoods along Navigation and just north of downtown. Both are largely Mexican-American, have some great older Victorian-era homes, and have a family/neighborly vibe that seems lost in most neighborhoods in Houston. Also, there are very active management districts in each working to make the areas more walkable, bikable, and, overall, more attractive. I'm re-building an old house just north of downtown right now. I was priced out of most of the Heights, but have found the Near Northside to be better than I expected. To the point that I now prefer it to the Heights in a lot of ways. It's a little like East Austin was back before it was gentrified. A little gritty, but also sort of charming. Surrounding my house are 3 abandoned houses and one that's half-burned. But, my neighbors are fantastic and I can be downtown in just a few minutes. As people get priced out of the Heights and Montrose, these two neighborhoods are likely to see a lot of investment.

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Tower26    14

Never take anything lightly. Anything can happen . Always be alert and make sure you have insurance . Safeguard your house .

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Montrose1100    2643

What does everyone think of those new developments going up in traditionally bad neighborhoods? I.e. North of downtown and off navigation. My husband and I are looking for our first home and have found that we can't afford the young areas we want like the Heights, Midtown, and and Montrose.

However, these new, cheap, neighborhoods still in the loop are bright and shiny but surrounded by "sketchy" areas. Is it a risky investment?? We really want to start renting out the house when we can afford a nicer one.

The area around Mason Park has some great foliage. When you cross the bayou it doesn't even feel like you're in the loop, let alone Houston.

 

The only concern I have about potentially buying in the area is flooding. I'd prefer to buy as close to the light rail and 59 (without hearing the noise), as possible. I watch HAR and Realty.com like a hawk and it seems like a few of the newer builds have gone down a little in price. There are also a lot of lots available. 

 

I think it would be a great investment as the area is going to change as much as the west end has changed. Slowly but surely. The potholes are pretty bad in most of the area, but where are they not bad in this city? I would personally not want to buy too close to the bayou (flooding), or 610 (smell & pollution).

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brian0123    360

I'd be less concerned about a neighborhood and more about renting it out in the future. If that's your thought going in, and it's in a townhouse community, there's a decent chance others are thinking the same. Ten years down the road (once maintenance is needed) and you have a lot of rental owners and an HOA that doesn't cover painting, roofs, etc... you could be in for a major headache. That's why I sold my TH in Midtown when we upgraded in the loop. The neighborhood was transitional (no biggie), but there were too many rentals around and some were starting to deteriorate.

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NenaE    116

The area around Mason Park has some great foliage. When you cross the bayou it doesn't even feel like you're in the loop, let alone Houston.

 

 

 

 

 

 

That area does have some beautiful mature trees, much like the nearby golf course land. It's easily recognized on the area's aerial maps.

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