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BaderJF

Speed limit

Increasing speed limits  

68 members have voted

  1. 1. Increase speed limits?

    • yes
      37
    • no
      15
    • maybe
      3
    • on new highways e.g. IH10
      9
    • add "speed lanes"
      4


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BaderJF    517

What do you think about increasing the speed limit on freeways and highways especially on IH10

to like 75 since many drivers go at least 80, or add "speed lanes" where a person can drive faster than

the regular lanes.

What do you think is a good speed limit?

 

Just something to see peoples opinion on

 

Edited by BaderJF

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arche_757    665

NO!  Safety first!  You increase to 75, then people will speed going 90, rather than 80.  Increase to 80, then people will want to drive 100.

 

We have WAY too many injuries and fatalities on the roads as it is - excluding those killed by people under the influence.

 

Increasing speed does nothing but make driving more dangerous.  And there are "Speed Lanes" - its called the Left Lane.  Its for passing.  ONLY.

Edited by arche_757

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HoustonMidtown    2,567

NO!  Safety first!  You increase to 75, then people will speed going 90, rather than 80.  Increase to 80, then people will want to drive 100.

 

We have WAY too many injuries and fatalities on the roads as it is - excluding those killed by people under the influence.

 

Increasing speed does nothing but make driving more dangerous.  And there are "Speed Lanes" - its called the Left Lane.  Its for passing.  ONLY.

 

 

From NMA  (http://www.motorists.org/speed-limits/faq)

 

Q. Isn't slower always safer?

A. No, federal and state studies have consistently shown that the drivers most likely to get into accidents in traffic are those traveling significantly below the average speed. According toresearch, those driving 10 mph slower than the prevailing speed are more likely to be involved in an accident. That means that if the average speed on an interstate is 70 mph, the person traveling at 60 mph is more likely to be involved in an accident than someone going 70 or even 80 mph.

Q. Wouldn't everyone drive faster if the speed limit was raised?

A. No, the majority of drivers will not go faster than what they feel is comfortable and safe regardless of the speed limit. For example, an 18-month study following an increase in the speed limit along the New York Thruway from 55 to 65 mph, determined that the average speed of traffic, 68 mph, remained the same. Even a national study conducted by Federal Highway Administration also concluded that raising or lowering the speed limit had practically no effect on actual travel speeds.

Q. Don't higher speed limits cause more accidents and traffic fatalities?

A. No, if a speed limit is raised to actually reflect real travel speeds, the new higher limit will make the roads safer. When the majority of traffic is traveling at the same speed, traffic flow improves, and there are fewer accidents. Speed alone is rarely the cause of accidents. Differences in speed are the main problem. Reasonable speed limits help traffic to flow at a safer, more uniform pace.

Q. Aren't most traffic accidents caused by speeding?

A. No, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) claims that 30 percent of all fatal accidents are "speed related," but even this is misleading. This means that in less than a third of the cases, one of the drivers involved in the accident was "assumed" to be exceeding the posted limit. It does not mean that speeding caused the accident. Research conducted by the Florida Department of Transportation showed that the percentage of accidents actually caused by speeding is very low, 2.2 percent.

Edited by HoustonMidtown

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arche_757    665

Wow!  You sure pulled that up quickly!

 

Those are good points.  However, my post should have included:  Drive THE speed limit marked, or slightly over (I tend to drive 3-4 miles faster on the freeways), road speeds I maintain an EXACT speed that's posted.  I'm not advocating for slower speeds, just for people to not speed.  I don't want to have to merge onto 59 at Greenbriar/Shepherd going 75 when it should be 65 or even 60 (due to the density of traffic).  Or worse at PEL off of Allen Parkway going 70 on that meager little acceleration lane.  That's almost suicidal right now, add 15 mph to the speed limit and we're talking impossible dangerous!

 

That's all I'm saying.

 

And speeding = reckless driving (talking about excessive speeding).  Reckless driving is dangerous.

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kylejack    847

From NMA  (http://www.motorists.org/speed-limits/faq)

 

Q. Isn't slower always safer?

A. No, federal and state studies have consistently shown that the drivers most likely to get into accidents in traffic are those traveling significantly below the average speed. According toresearch, those driving 10 mph slower than the prevailing speed are more likely to be involved in an accident. That means that if the average speed on an interstate is 70 mph, the person traveling at 60 mph is more likely to be involved in an accident than someone going 70 or even 80 mph.

Q. Wouldn't everyone drive faster if the speed limit was raised?

A. No, the majority of drivers will not go faster than what they feel is comfortable and safe regardless of the speed limit. For example, an 18-month study following an increase in the speed limit along the New York Thruway from 55 to 65 mph, determined that the average speed of traffic, 68 mph, remained the same. Even a national study conducted by Federal Highway Administration also concluded that raising or lowering the speed limit had practically no effect on actual travel speeds.

These two answers contradict each other. If increasing the speed limit won't make everyone drive faster, then those who continue to drive slower will cause more accidents with those who speed up. "those driving 10 mph slower than the prevailing speed are more likely to be involved in an accident"

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gmac    167

Hard-hitting research from the NMA. No biases there :lol:

 

I'm fully in favor of special lanes on all roads for people who hate speed limits... with 20-foot high walls so when they crash they incinerate each other and help clean out the gene pool.

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LarryDierker    3,137

We need more police on the freeways and roads to enforce the current laws and limits. It's crazy out there.

 

I go weeks without seeing a cop on the freeways and I commute all the way to Clear Lake.

 

 

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BaderJF    517

NO! Safety first! You increase to 75, then people will speed going 90, rather than 80. Increase to 80, then people will want to drive 100.

We have WAY too many injuries and fatalities on the roads as it is - excluding those killed by people under the influence.

Increasing speed does nothing but make driving more dangerous. And there are "Speed Lanes" - its called the Left Lane. Its for passing. ONLY.

Yes the left lane is for speeding, however you always have that person who decides to go slow and have a bunch of cars behind that makes people angry and cause traffic.

Speed lanes would have a minimum speed and the right of way for people going faster

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sevfiv    1,344

I don't feel safe in my little tin can at very high speeds (75+) - plus the mpg blows. As for above, yeah, passing lane is for passing. Some people just don't get that.

 

 

25339788.jpg

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mkultra25    505

I don't feel safe in my little tin can at very high speeds (75+) - plus the mpg blows. As for above, yeah, passing lane is for passing. Some people just don't get that.

 

 

25339788.jpg

 

Bonus: coming back into town from Sugar Land on 59 earlier this afternoon, I was one of several cars stuck behind a dump truck that was cruising along in the passing lane for several miles with absolutely no intention of moving over. I was really wishing a cop would spot him, pull him over, and write him up. After a savage beating to ensure that he doesn't ever forget proper lane discipline again. 

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mkultra25    505

There are always going to be conflicting issues when it comes to speed limits.

 

1. Speed limits are ridiculously low on the major highways, if the design and engineering of the roads is the only consideration. The original autobahnen built in Germany in the 1930s look like country two-lanes compared to something like I-10, where 60-70 mph can feel like 20 mph on a surface street. 

 

People recognize this, which is why it was previously pointed out:

 

 

 

Q. Wouldn't everyone drive faster if the speed limit was raised?
A. No, the majority of drivers will not go faster than what they feel is comfortable and safe regardless of the speed limit. For example, an 18-month study following an increase in the speed limit along the New York Thruway from 55 to 65 mph, determined that the average speed of traffic, 68 mph, remained the same. Even a national study conducted by Federal Highway Administration also concluded that raising or lowering the speed limit had practically no effect on actual travel speeds.

 

Note that what feels safe can vary widely from car to car - in a new sports car 70 mph may be loafing along, while in an elderly sedan with tired suspension and brakes, the same speed can induce a serious pucker factor. 

 

2. Unfortunately, as is demonstrated on a daily basis, most people have little to no understanding of the basic physics involved in car control. This situation is made worse by the fact that IMO it's far too easy to get a driver's license. It would be great if a driving test involved real-world freeway survival skills imparted through a day at the racetrack, but it'll never happen because any attempt to toughen driver standards will set the children to whining that the gubmint is overstepping its boundaries, conveniently ignoring the fact that driving is a privilege and not a right. In my version of utopia, you wouldn't be able to operate a motor vehicle on a public roadway until you've fully internalized the realities that you WILL roll over if you attempt a sudden change in direction in a vehicle with a high center of gravity (such as an SUV) at elevated speeds, and that you WILL NOT be able to stop a 2.5 ton pickup in 100 feet from 90 mph.

 

3. Corollary to #2: too many people treat their vehicles like extensions of their living rooms, and are consequently focused on everything but their surroundings and what their vehicles are doing. While I'm dreaming, if everyone had to ride a motorcycle around any of the major highways in town during rush hour for one day as part of the Utopian Driving Test, it would probably do more to convince drivers to put their phones down and pay attention than any legislative prohibition ever will. 

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Ross    658

Speed limit should be lowered for environmental reasons. Also accidents are more devestating at higher speeds

 

You weren't driving when the speed limit was 55, were you? If you think it's so great, try driving from Houston to El Paso at 55.

 

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IronTiger    763

Speed limit should be lowered for environmental reasons. Also accidents are more devestating at higher speeds

I think I read on HAIF that that's why many urban highways are 65 MPH, because of emission control reasons (though the reasoning behind this is out of date).

Regardless, I have 3 things to say:

1. I'm nostalgic for the 65 MPH Night speed limit, and I feel it would be safer to go a bit slower at night anyway. (see my avatar)

2. 75 MPH on non-limited access highways is ridiculous. While 75 going down a freeway is divine, it's not so great if you have someone turning in or out.

3. Lowering speed limits on roads is often a way to create a speed trap where none exists. Even at current situations, this is still aggravating: Highway 6 from Navasota to Hempstead has many rural driveways and a few cross streets. It's 75 MPH. Highway 290 from Hempstead to Houston is 65 and fully limited access. BOOM! The highway patrol will get'cha! I also agree with the posters above that it won't really slow down average traffic or make things safer.

 

This situation is made worse by the fact that IMO it's far too easy to get a driver's license. It would be great if a driving test involved real-world freeway survival skills imparted through a day at the racetrack

When I was in high school, I actually won the opportunity to give my car some high-speed braking and other crazy stuff with my car (a '92 Sable at the time, which doesn't have ABS). I literally felt that the car was going to hit someone, flip over, or crash into the concrete wall at the end of the track. None of those actually happened, but holy **** it was terrifying.

Edited by IronTiger
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Slick Vik    444

You weren't driving when the speed limit was 55, were you? If you think it's so great, try driving from Houston to El Paso at 55.

 

 

Who would drive from Houston to El Paso?

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august948    700

Who would drive from Houston to El Paso?

 

You need to get out more often.  I10 is a major east-west artery running from Jacksonville to LA.

 

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Ross    658

Who would drive from Houston to El Paso?

 

A family of three that can't afford to buy $1000 in plane tickets, plus wants to camp in Big Bend along the way. Quit projecting your desires and lifestyle on others.

 

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arche_757    665

Who would drive from Houston to El Paso?

 

If you've never been to the far west Texas desert then you are sadly missing some great open space that is both raw and beautiful.  Big Bend, Davis Mountains and Guadalupe Mountains are all quite interesting.  Also, Marfa and Alpine are nice smaller towns - Marfa in particular is quite the artists hotbed.  It is worth the trip.  Besides the Hill Country from Boerne to Ozona is pretty too.

 

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mkultra25    505

If you've never been to the far west Texas desert then you are sadly missing some great open space that is both raw and beautiful.  Big Bend, Davis Mountains and Guadalupe Mountains are all quite interesting.  

 

Yep. You haven't lived until you've driven all night across West Texas and arrived at the entrance to Big Bend at sunrise (for those who haven't been there, once you hit the main entrance on 385 coming from Marathon there's another 25-30 miles until you reach the park headquarters). 

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JLWM8609    486

I think the speed limits on some of the freeways in TxDOT's Houston District need to be raised, not to 75 or 80 like on the rural interstates between major metro areas in TX, but to levels that are appropriate for surrounding population density, highway design, and traffic level. 70 mph is a reasonable limit for the freeways in suburban and rural areas and serves as a good buffer between the 75 mph zones outside the Houston District and the 65 mph zones inside the Houston District. Let's use the Katy Freeway for example. From the Bexar County line to the Brazos River, the limit is 75 mph. From the Brazos River to Highway 6, a 70 mph limit would be reasonable, with a 65 mph limit from Highway 6 to 610, and continuing the current 60 mph limit inside 610. As it stands now, the limit drops from 75 to 65 at the Brazos River and continues at 65 until Katy or so, before dropping down to 60 from Katy to Downtown.

 

For those who think higher limits will turn everyone into speed demons, have you driven the stretches of I-45 and I-10 that have 75 mph speed limits? Prior to the speed limit increase, traffic flowed at 70-75 mph in 70 mph zones. In my travels, I have observed that even with the increase in the speed limit, traffic is still generally flowing at 70-75 mph.

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samagon    2,071

I think in the city, probably beltway and in, the limit needs to be lowered to like 55. Think about it. Your average trip in town is maybe 10 miles on a freeway, so you only lose 30 seconds off the drive going 55 vs 60 and you save substantially on gas. And despite what some studies say, it is safer.

Outside of town it should be raised substantially, 85. On a 200 mile trip that's a decent amount of time you could save. Make some toll lanes and make it even higher, obviously at that point you'd need a special inspection, tire rating, brakes, etc. I think a lot would pay.

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Slick Vik    444

You need to get out more often. I10 is a major east-west artery running from Jacksonville to LA.

I've been on 10 on the extreme ends, in LA and Florida.

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Slick Vik    444

A family of three that can't afford to buy $1000 in plane tickets, plus wants to camp in Big Bend along the way. Quit projecting your desires and lifestyle on others.

$1000? I see tickets frequently for $69 each way on Southwest Airlines. Also Amtrak is a viable alternative that doesn't require driving and stops in alpine.

If you've never been to the far west Texas desert then you are sadly missing some great open space that is both raw and beautiful. Big Bend, Davis Mountains and Guadalupe Mountains are all quite interesting. Also, Marfa and Alpine are nice smaller towns - Marfa in particular is quite the artists hotbed. It is worth the trip. Besides the Hill Country from Boerne to Ozona is pretty too.

I plan to take amtrak to alpine sometime next month and will check out big bend.

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IronTiger    763

Also Amtrak is a viable alternative that doesn't require driving and stops in alpine.

Um, no. Given the little frequency Amtrak travels and a bunch of missing routes (you cannot get from California to Florida anymore on the Sunset Limited, traffic was suspended after Katrina, and it still is, over 8 years later).

I think the speed limits on some of the freeways in TxDOT's Houston District need to be raised, not to 75 or 80 like on the rural interstates between major metro areas in TX, but to levels that are appropriate for surrounding population density, highway design, and traffic level.

I spotted a posted 60 MPH speed limit on 610 when I was in Houston yesterday. Needless to say, traffic was not going at 60.

I've been on 10 on the extreme ends, in LA and Florida.

I think they meant IN-BETWEEN them, not just in-town driving on "The 10".

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Slick Vik    444

Um, no. Given the little frequency Amtrak travels and a bunch of missing routes (you cannot get from California to Florida anymore on the Sunset Limited, traffic was suspended after Katrina, and it still is, over 8 years later).

I spotted a posted 60 MPH speed limit on 610 when I was in Houston yesterday. Needless to say, traffic was not going at 60.

I think they meant IN-BETWEEN them, not just in-town driving on "The 10".

 

Amtrak goes to El Paso three times a week.

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