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bluedobie

Restoring shiplap interior

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bluedobie    0

Looking for advice on restoring shiplap in an old bungalow. I've removed the sheetrock and "most" of the wallpaper and cheesecloth, still removing the nails used for putting up the wallpaper (lots of cursing), and need to finish removing the mold "dust" left behind from Ike.

Plan on lightly sanding by hand when I'm finished...have done so on a portion of one wall as a test. Need to know what type of caulk you've used to make it air/bug tight, any sealant or coating, etc. I plan to leave some walls natural and paint others.

Thanks!

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musicman    178

Looking for advice on restoring shiplap in an old bungalow. I've removed the sheetrock and "most" of the wallpaper and cheesecloth, still removing the nails used for putting up the wallpaper (lots of cursing), and need to finish removing the mold "dust" left behind from Ike.

Plan on lightly sanding by hand when I'm finished...have done so on a portion of one wall as a test. Need to know what type of caulk you've used to make it air/bug tight, any sealant or coating, etc. I plan to leave some walls natural and paint others.

Thanks!

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i've only seen walls polyurethaned which helped to seal. I guess you could caulk but to be honest, i'm not sure it would look good. Are you going to insulate?

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cgallagher    3

A fifty dollar investment in an electronic hand sander would go a long way. Countersink all exposed nail heads. Then fill with a stainable wood filler that you can buy at any hardware store. Run the hand sander over the entire wall untill the holes and joints are relatively smooth with a 100 grit paper, then a 180 grit, and finally a 220 grit sandpaper. Then put your oil based stain of your choosing. Lightly sand with 220 grit again and touch up any spots. Then apply a couple of coats of oil based sealer. Light sanding between coats. If there are large gaps at the joints, fill them with a color matching caulk.

Have Fun.

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bluedobie    0

I do have a little electric hand sander and a punch to countersink the nails that cannot be removed without damaging the wood. Thanks for the input!!!

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bluedobie    0

And I definitely plan on adding insulation, after discovering there is none between the shiplap and exterior siding. Learning a lot as a result of Hurricane Ike!

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jm1fd    1

A more aggressive sander such as a belt sander or an angle grinder would probably make things go faster, espescially when it comes to getting things more or less even. You can follow up with the hand sander for the final pass.

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innerlooper    25

The shiplap was never designed to be exposed so presumably you are looking for a rustic look. If you are not going to paint, then you will need to fill gaps with a closely matched caulk. DAP has dark brown available. The planks when applied were not kiln dried hence the 1/4"+ gaps.

I have seen some owners remove the wall shiplap (use a cat's paw to get the nails out) and flip it over, packing the edges for a better seal. Start the reinstallation at the ceiling and work down. This will result in a gap at the lowest course to floor, however this can be filled with a ripped piece and/ or covered with baseboard.

Removing and flipping may not be possible with the ceiling shiplap. Many bungalows were built with the ceiling planks laid over the top wall plates, hence it is locked into the structure.

Be careful about blowing loose-fill insulation into the outside wall. If its balloon-framed, without blocking below, the insulation will just end up under the house.

5" or 6" random orbit sander is definitely the way to go. Use the vacuum attachment if possible. And wear dust and hearing protection.

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bluedobie    0

I didn't realize the shiplap wasn't intended to be exposed, learn something new every day! Plan to keep a few walls "natural", paint others to give it a cottage look, and remove and replace with sheetrock a couple to use that material for areas with old termite damage. It's a real bugger removing planks, guess that's when a man would come in handy!

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Scott08    8

Check out the interior of the Big Mamou restaurant on Studewood. The owner turned the shiplap over as suggested, left it exposed and stained in the main dining room. Looks good I think.

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Dan the Man    33

I didn't realize the shiplap wasn't intended to be exposed, learn something new every day!

Typically, stretched cotton cloth was tacked to the shiplap to hide the joints, then wallpaper was glued to the cloth. In the 1950s, many homeowners applied 1/4" sheetrock over the wallpaper. Typically, the wider the shiplap, the older the house...

I wouldn't sand the surface or flip the boards over. I'd rather keep the character of the nail holes and imperfections, but that's just me. I'd just remove the nails and finish with linseed oil or orange shellac.

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house567    5

You're a real trooper for attempting such a job...or like me, the first time owner of an olde house. In our case, I removed the qtr. in. sheetrock, tore off the old cloth, numbered the planks, removed each, added more electrical circuits and updated wiring (welcome to the world of knob & tube wiring), AND INSULATION, replaced the planks for hurricane strength I hope, new sheetrock, paint etc.

Good luck!

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bluedobie    0

It was built in 1920 and had newer sheetrock in most rooms over ancient wallpaper that was over the cloth, which was nailed to the boards. That cloth has been a pain, because it's stuck behind nails that I can't get a prybar underneath to pop out. Blech. The sanding is mainly to remove the marks left behind from all of the mold.

Definitely didn't plan on this undertaking, but Hurricane Ike had other plans. angry.gif

There has been a lot of very useful information provided that I'll put to use. Never would have thought about flipping the boards (although it seems like a no-brainer once you hear it!), but plan to save that for a future project. Now if I screw something up, there'll be a backup plan!

If I can dodge the layoffs at work and figure out how to keep working on this place with yet another pay cut that I'm sure is coming, the old place may end up as my primary home one day!

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Dean3326    0

So how did this turn out ? I've got a house that I believe it was built in 1896. I am about 3 hours north of Houston. Every wall and ceiling in the 2 story 2500 square foot has is shiplap. I'm about to start work on it and looking for any tips any one may have. 

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Jenny Smith    0

Funny how I exposed walls in my 1880's house, and it had painted shiplap (not recent paint).. How I know? It had muslin and nails with wall paper over it. So, yes at some points shiplap was used as a exposed wall. 

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